About Leslie

Leslie Day is author of Field Guide to the Natural World of New York City; Field Guide to the Street Trees of New York City; and the Field Guide to the Neighborhood Birds of New York City, Johns Hopkins University Press, now available in bookstores and online. http://www.fieldguidenyc.com

By Leslie Day The next to the last day of September, I was walking in Fort Tryon Park in Washington Heights from the Heather Garden, and just before I got to Sir William’s Dog Run, my eye caught a movement high up in the northern red oak tree. Warblers! Knowing it’s migration time for insect...

By Leslie Day We hear them throughout the day, their high-pitched, keening, keeeeeeearr, over and over again, calling for their parents to feed them a pigeon, a rat, a squirrel. Lucky us to have three gorgeous juvenile red-tail hawks: Buteo jamaicensis: Buteo: a kind of hawk; jamaicensis: the island of Jamaica where specimens were given...

By Leslie Day Amelanchier canadensis, or the downy serviceberry tree, is one of the first to bloom in early spring in the northeastern United States. New York City has just gone through a long , brutally cold, and snowy winter. The snow has finally disappeared, but there are new puffs of white dotting the hills...

by Leslie Day The house sparrow’s Latin Name, Passer domesticus means small, active bird (Passer) belonging to a house: domesticus). One hundred house sparrows were introduced from Europe into Brooklyn, Manhattan and Chicago in the early 1850s and the species expanded throughout North America. It is the most commonly seen bird throughout the five boroughs....

by Leslie Day  Taken from a talk and presentation given in Inwood Hill Park on December 6, 2014.

Though I have lived in Manhattan for most of my life, I had never seen such an abundance of skunks until I moved to Fort Tryon Gardens. Beautiful, crepuscular, quiet, determined, and forever nosing around for food, I find them endlessly fascinating. Mephitis mephitis is a remarkable animal. Mephitis is Latin for foul odor. Mephitis...

The Nature of Our Neighborhood: The Beneficial Wasps of Fort Tryon Gardens By Leslie Day Coming into 295 Bennett the other morning I spotted a cicada sitting quietly on the brick of our building and I looked around to see if its archenemy – the cicada killer wasp – was nearby. Last year was a...

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